Raising Awareness About FASD

Dr. Susan D. Rich has given Grand Rounds at the University of Minnesota Department of Psychiatry on November 12, 2014 and at Georgetown University Medical Center on Tuesday, January 6th about the topic of Neurodevelopmental Disorder associated with Prenatal Alcohol Exposure (ND-PAE), the diagnostic term in DSM-5 for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.

In an article in Psychiatric News in 2005, Dr. Rich said:  “I was furious when I first heard the term ‘funny-looking kid,’ or FLK, almost 12 years ago. A rural pediatrician was describing how doctors overlook the possibility of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), the physical and neuropsychiatric effects of prenatal alcohol exposure. He said, ‘They look at the parents and say – `They’re pretty funny looking, too.. .so, I guess it’s genetic.’ My passion for prevention of alcohol-related birth defects has been fueled by such attitudes.”

Dr. Rich has been speaking widely about her clinical work with patients who have ND-PAE and the clinical link between autism and FASD. In November, she also spoke at the Minnesota Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome’s annual conference: “FASD and Human Rights.”  During October, she chaired an all day Etiology, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention in an Era of DSM-5 at the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry annual conference in San Diego, California.

DSM-5 includes the diagnosis of “Neurodevelopmental Disorder Associated with Prenatal Alcohol Exposure” (ND-PAE) under “Specified Other Neurodevelopmental Disorders” (315.8). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that as many as 1 in 20 (or 2-5%) of school aged children in middle class communities have some degree of this preventable disorder. Up to 85% of individuals with ND-PAE have a lifetime prevalence of moderate to severe mental illness.

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