FASD – Condition affects one baby born each day – and is more common than autism — Edmonton and area Fetal Alcohol Network Society

MOTHERS-to-be are being warned about the incurable condition that strikes one baby born each day in the North-East. More than 300 babies born in the region every year suffering from Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Source: http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/news/14709699. Condition_affects_one_baby_born_each_day_____and_is_more_common_than_autism_/ A pregnant woman with a glass of wine The condition is more common than autism, spina bifida […]

via FASD – Condition affects one baby born each day – and is more common than autism — Edmonton and area Fetal Alcohol Network Society

And the Emmy goes to…”A LONG JOURNEY HOME”

” A Long Journey Home” (in Romanian…”Lungul drum spre casa”), a documentary about Dr. Ron Federici and his three adopted sons, reveals their traumatic history and the terrible conditions in Romanian orphanages. The film won an international award for journalism with NY Film festivals and was nominated for an Emmy. It has been shown worldwide receiving great acclaim. Ron Federici, his sons, and the documentary producers were courageous in shedding light on the human rights atrocities in Romanian orphanages.  The film will bring tears to your eyes and hope will fill your heart in learning about Petric who Dr. Federici rescued from an orphanage and went on to graduate from the George Washington University Medical School.
Dr. Ronald S. Federici is a Board Certified Clinical-Developmental Neuropsychologist and a member of CEO-Care for Children International, Inc.

Alcohol Embryopathy

Letter to the Washington Post Editor submitted 1/25/16 by Susan D. Rich, MD, MPH, DFAPA:

An article on January 18, 2016 in the Washington Post’s Health and Science section, “This mother drank while pregnant. Here’s what her daughter’s like at 43,” features a courageous mother, Kathy Mitchell, and her daughter Karli who should be applauded for their tireless efforts to raise awareness about this prevalent and preventable condition.  Over the past 22-25+ years, Kathy and Karli have done great work to raise awareness about FAS. Kathy is the renown spokesperson for and Vice President of the National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.  Karli has worked diligently as a volunteer in the office, stuffing envelopes, creating artwork for their logos, and providing an optimistic outlook with her beautiful smile that lights up a room. She won the Presidential Points of Light Award for her volunteerism. Their story is depicted in my 2001 Documentary: Dispelling Myths about Alcohol-related Birth Defects:  http://www.susanrich.info/psychoffice/patient_myths.html.  

Unfortunately, the article perpetuates the myth that intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental problems only occur in heavy drinkers and that effects of prenatal alcohol exposure are relatively uncommon.  Alcohol can cause a range of neurodevelopmental disorders – actually nearly every neurodevelopmental disorder of childhood can be caused by alcohol.  Here’s a chapter I co-authored in an International book on autism: http://www.intechopen.com/…/clinical-implications-of-a-link….  We’ve known since 1981 about an important “missing link” about prenatal alcohol exposure (from a seminal paper published by Dr. Kathleen K. Sulik at the University of North Carolina)  that neurodevelopmental disorders (brain damage) associated with prenatal alcohol exposure (ND-PAE) can happen with as little as 4-5 servings of alcohol in one “binge” episode as early as the 3rd week post conception.  This is actually the period of embryonic development, not fetal development.  So, the real term for babies with the facial features and severe deficits associated with prenatal alcohol exposure is “alcohol embryopathy.”

With 13.5% of childbearing age women binge drinking and 50% of pregnancies unplanned, inadvertent prenatal alcohol exposure before a woman knows she is pregnant means that not only alcoholic women are having babies with FAS.  In truth, not all affected children have the tell-tell signs of characteristic facial features, severe intellectual disability and growth deficiency like Karli.  As a child/adolescent and adult psychiatrist, I see first-hand the mood dysregulation, sensory and motor disorders, ADHD and executive functioning problems, and social communication delays caused by prenatal alcohol exposure. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we have an epidemic of 1 in 20 school age American children with preventable brain damage caused by prenatal alcohol exposure.  Neurodevelopmental Disorder associated with Prenatal Alcohol Exposure (ND-PAE), the topic of my upcoming book – “The Silent Epidemic: A Child Psychiatrist’s Journey beyond Death Row,” may be among the most significant public health crises since polio.

For 23 years, I have asked this simple question:  Why has the alcohol industry not been held accountable for a failure to warn about this prevalent and preventable condition?  A small label on their products indicating risk for birth defects in pregnant women is too little too late in my opinion – since much damage has already occurred before a woman knows she is pregnant.  Pharmaceutical manufacturers, the tobacco industry, and other corporate megaliths have been called out for harm caused by their products.  Attorney Laura Riley and I recently addressed this question in a chapter in an international book on Legal/Ethical issues in FASD http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319208657   Neurodevelopmental Disorder Associated with Prenatal Alcohol Exposure: Consumer Protection and the Industry’s Duty to Warn [Rich, Susan D. ​ and Riley, Laura J​.  Pages 39-47​;  ​Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in Adults: Ethical and Legal Perspectives. An overview on FASD for professionals. Editors: Nelson, Monty, Trussler, Marguerite (Eds.)].  My blog attempts to address the missing link by recommending that alcohol users prevent pregnancy not just stopping drinking after pregnancy recognition.  See http://www.bettersafethansorryproject.com.

 

Remember – if you drink alcohol and are of childbearing potential, avoid pregnancy (i.e., contracept or avoid sex). If you are pregnant or planning pregnancy, avoid alcohol.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are now promoting our message – It’s better to be safe than sorry – alcohol and unprotected sex don’t mix!!! http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2016/p0202-alcohol-exposed-pregnancy.html.

 

“Prince George’s County Maryland – An Opportunity for FASD Awareness”

Last summer, local attorney Evan Wilson had a “light bulb moment” during Dr. Rich’s presentation in Prince George’s County, MD on June 20 about FASD and the law. Dr. Rich and two of the “BSTS change agents” met with him to discuss his perspectives about the role of the judiciary system in identifying and assisting individuals affected by FASD. As a juvenile delinquency attorney, he represents indigent minors in court who cannot afford to pay a lawyer. As Assistant Public Defender in PG County, he sees his job as educating the court about his client as a whole and not solely focused on a “snapshot” of the person’s life. Like the age old question – “Do we look at the crime or the individual?”, public defender Wilson sees the importance of making the court aware of challenges they face in their lives. “If you look at a person they are more than one event, they have a whole life behind them.” He emphasizes the importance of the right treatment protocol for a successful recovery to prevent recidivism (future delinquent acts).  He believes that further education and awareness in the PG County court system to be able to appropriately intervene in the lives of adolescents and adults affected by FASD.

Raising Awareness About FASD

Dr. Susan D. Rich has given Grand Rounds at the University of Minnesota Department of Psychiatry on November 12, 2014 and at Georgetown University Medical Center on Tuesday, January 6th about the topic of Neurodevelopmental Disorder associated with Prenatal Alcohol Exposure (ND-PAE), the diagnostic term in DSM-5 for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.

In an article in Psychiatric News in 2005, Dr. Rich said:  “I was furious when I first heard the term ‘funny-looking kid,’ or FLK, almost 12 years ago. A rural pediatrician was describing how doctors overlook the possibility of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), the physical and neuropsychiatric effects of prenatal alcohol exposure. He said, ‘They look at the parents and say – `They’re pretty funny looking, too.. .so, I guess it’s genetic.’ My passion for prevention of alcohol-related birth defects has been fueled by such attitudes.”

Dr. Rich has been speaking widely about her clinical work with patients who have ND-PAE and the clinical link between autism and FASD. In November, she also spoke at the Minnesota Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome’s annual conference: “FASD and Human Rights.”  During October, she chaired an all day Etiology, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention in an Era of DSM-5 at the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry annual conference in San Diego, California.

DSM-5 includes the diagnosis of “Neurodevelopmental Disorder Associated with Prenatal Alcohol Exposure” (ND-PAE) under “Specified Other Neurodevelopmental Disorders” (315.8). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that as many as 1 in 20 (or 2-5%) of school aged children in middle class communities have some degree of this preventable disorder. Up to 85% of individuals with ND-PAE have a lifetime prevalence of moderate to severe mental illness.

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The Better Safe Than Sorry Team Wishes You a Year of Happiness Through Alcohol-Free Sex

In the spirit of prevention and enlightenment, our goal for 2015 is to raise awareness about how early in pregnancy ND-PAE happens.  As little as 4-5 drinks exquisitely timed before you know you’re pregnant can cause brain wiring changes and even full Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. It only takes one Long Island iced tea or a hand full of shots to cause a lifetime of struggles for your child. Your unborn child is also not immune to the harm of beer and wine.

Remember: It’s Better to be Safe than Sorry – Alcohol and Unprotected Sex don’t mix!