Save the Date – Open Door Book Reading and Signing in Bethesda, MD

Event Details
Martha Collins and Mary Evelyn Greene
Sun, 23 Nov, 2014 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM 
Martha Collins reads from Day Unto Day. She is joined by Mary Evelyn Greene, author of When Rain Hurts. The reading will be followed by a reception and book signing.

Martha Collins is the author of Day Unto DayWhite Papers,  and Blue Front , a book-length poem based on a lynching her father witnessed when he was five years old. Collins has also published four earlier collections of poems, three books of co-translations from the Vietnamese, and two chapbooks. Both White Papers andBlue Front won Ohioana awards. Blue Front also won an Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, and was chosen as one of “25 Books to Remember from 2006” by the New York Public Library. Collins’ other awards include fellowships from the NEA, the Bunting Institute, the Ingram Merrill Foundation, and the Witter Bynner Foundation, as well as three Pushcart Prizes, the Alice Fay Di Castagnola Award, a Lannan residency grant, and the Laurence Goldstein Poetry Prize.

Mary Evelyn Greene, Senior Managing Attorney with the Environmental Integrity Project, adopted two IMG_3401toddlers from Russia in 2004. Ever since, she has devoted herself to improving her alcohol-exposed son’s conditions, publishing articles in Adoptive Families Magazine and Adoption Today along the way. She is a contributing author to Easy to Love but Hard to Raise (2012), a collection of stories written for and by parents of special needs kids. She currently lives in Silver Spring with her husband and children. When Rain Hurts is her first book.

Location: The Writer’s Center
4508 Walsh Street
Bethesda, MD 20815
Fees: Free admission
Contact: 301-654-8664 or post.master@writer.org
Calendar: Workshop & Event Calendar
Category: Open Door Reading
As part of the BTST Book Club series Dr. Rich and her change agents were very fortunate to be given the opportunity to sit down with Mary Greene and talk with her about her journey of adoption and the struggles and joy she and her husband have experienced since then.
From discussions about her son’s disruptive behavior to learning about and dealing with his FASD-related special needs, she opens up her life in a very honest and touching way.
“When rain hurts” by Mary Greene
Her book has inspired us and will hopefully motivate others to change their lifestyle behaviors before, not just during, pregnancy.

FASD Awareness Day 2014 “Bring on the Beer and Pass Out the Condoms”

Our Better Safe than Sorry Project effort with Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washington in recognition of FASD Awareness Day was a success.  Six volunteers distributed condoms at a booth outside The Barking Dog bar in Bethesda, Maryland on Saturday evening (before the party crowd).  Our aim was to test the idea as a pilot project, to gather reactions from pedestrians and patrons, and to learn more for future campaign events.

Booth

Our display booth with free condoms was visited by a number of pedestrians and bar patrons.

Table with condoms

Informational condom cards made a nice display with the U.S. Surgeon General’s warning cards by the bathroom door.

 Bathroom stalls

We posted posters behind the bathroom stalls where customers could read over the information in privacy.

Top 10 BSTS Lessons Learned about Condom Distribution:

  1.  Female bartenders felt passing a condom with the first drink of the evening would seem like a proposition. Duh! Why didn’t we think of that???

  1.  50 and 60-somethings agreed to share the informational condom pocket cards with their 20 and 30-somethings (who were partying elsewhere) – men seemed more open than women.

  1.  A scientist from the Environmental Protection Agency now knows that prenatal alcohol exposure affects 2-6% of American children – a bigger problem than environmental chemicals!

  1.  Most people thought that the CDC rate of 1 in 8 (13%) underestimated true numbers of college women binge drinking and were shocked that 50% of U.S. pregnancies are unplanned.

  2.  When passing a condom to a pedestrian, do so discretely (i.e., whisper, don’t shout – “Use a condom if you drink alcohol!”).

Pass it on –  Contracept if you drink alcohol to prevent FASD!!!!

Free Condoms at the Barking Dog Bar and Grill for FASD Awareness Day

In recognition of FASD Awareness Day, on September 6th, the Better Safe than Sorry Project Team will be at the Barking Dog pub in Bethesda, MD distributing 999 condoms and informational materials about FASD.

The condoms were donated by the Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washington.  For each first drink of the evening purchased, patrons of the bar will receive a condom with a bookmark cover to promote contraception for alcohol consumers.  BSTS project volunteers will provide information and a brief discussion about FASD for those who express interest in learning more.

 front of condom cover  inside of condom cover Back of condom cover

Our project concept was developed by our interns after the idea was suggested during one of our summer talk show segments.  From a primary prevention perspective, It’s a little further “upstream” approach than the pregnancy test kits in bars – another extraordinarily innovative project implemented in Minnesota and Alaska.

STOP our social drug of choice from affecting 2-6% of school aged children with preventable brain damage.  Just like HIV/AIDS & STD prevention, help spread the word to “contracept if you use alcohol!” 

Special thanks to BSTS volunteers Melissa Blair and Nick Muzic, BSTS interns Sydnie Butin, Juliana Pietri, Carlye Hillman, Kaitlyn Gularson, and Nathalie Pollack, and our fabulous BSTS Blog Master, Daniela Mielke for creating and implementing the innovative FASD Awareness Day prevention project. We are also thankful to the Barking Dog bar and grill for letting us promote our project there and to Robert Ridley of Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washington for donating the condoms.

Prevention Approaches in Australia

BSTS Blog Series: “Protecting unborn babies from alcohol-related harm”

Written by Nathalie P

Prevention Approaches in Australia

At first glance, it seems outrageous that children with FASD can’t have a normal life because their mother’s irresponsible decision to use alcohol during pregnancy. In some communities, the high prevalence rates of alcoholism and social pressures make alcohol abuse common during pregnancy. The “Lililwan Project” has been established to study the prevalence of FASD in Australia where rates are high among indigenous (aboriginal) populations. The project aims to help children with FASD by involving families, doctors, and teachers to address their unique learning and developmental issues. It also raises awareness about the dangers of drinking alcohol during pregnancy. These efforts have led to some aboriginal groups in Western Australia taking action to prevent FASD by successfully limiting the sales of hard liquor in their communities.

My question is – if small communities in Australia are able to get the message out that alcohol use at any point in pregnancy is dangerous, what is stopping us from spreading the word throughout the U.S.?

The Need for Public Education about FASD/ND-PAE

BSTS Blog Series: “Protecting unborn babies from alcohol-related harm”

Written by Nathalie P

The Need for Public Education about FASD/ND-PAE

Through health classes in school, we have learned that consuming alcohol while pregnant is a problem. However, I believe kids and teenagers don’t learn enough about the damage drinking during pregnancy can cause. We are taught that alcohol use increases rates of violence, crime, and sometimes death or suicide. What schools should also teach us is that consuming it even before you know you are pregnant can lead to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or other Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). These problems can range from physical birth defects to “functional” birth defects, which may include intellectual disability, learning issues, mood outbursts, and other psychiatric or behavior problems. These are serious and irreversible effects on the life of a child.

The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism have programs available for high school, middle school, and elementary school teachers to educate children and adolescents about FASD. These programs are available online through the following websites:

NOFAS FASD Kindergarten through 12th Grade Education and Prevention Curriculum: http://www.nofas.org/k-12-curriculum/

UNC-CH Better Safe than Sorry Curriculum: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/Science/curriculum.html